Your Right to Listen, At The RIAA’s Pleasure

We reject the view that copyright owners and their licensees are required to provide consumers with perpetual access to creative works. No other product or service providers are held to such lofty standards. No one expects computers or other electronics devices to work properly in perpetuity, and there is no reason that any particular mode of distributing copyrighted works should be required to do so.

— Steven Metalitz, Washington DC representative of the MPAA and RIAA in a letter to the US Copyright Office

What an undeniable load of crap! Plain fact is that, for the better part of century, creative works (especially music) were held to exactly this lofty standard. Moreover, no other industry forces consumers to buy a product that is crippled by design. My electronic devices aren’t engineered to self-destruct when the manufacturer instructs them to. Not so the hobbled music we purchase from online stores, where that same store must provide us with the ability to get through the DRM…until they go out of business or shutter their service.

— Kvatch

10 thoughts on “Your Right to Listen, At The RIAA’s Pleasure”

  1. My copy of Dune disappeared while I was reading it!
    It must have just expired… time to buy the book again.

  2. DRM is like prohibition , it encourages people to break the law. You couldn’t copy the old LPs, but when audio tapes came out, my music collection doubled overnight. The fact that most of my music collection is now on iTunes is a bit scary, a court case, or a political ruling, I could wake up one morning to noTunes.

  3. Metaputz is like the anti-Castro wingnut who smokes cubans at every swanky soiree. What a fucking tool. No offense to the useful tools out there, hammers, saws, you know who you are.

  4. Robert… Amazon censoring Kindle content again? ;-)

    Holte Ender… I’ve ripped my entire collection but refuse to purchase music from iTunes. Do have some MP3’s from Amazon though…DRM free.

    Randal… Hmmm… I wonder if Castro plans to DRM to those cigars that come from Havana:

    We reject the view that tobacco owners and their licensees are required to provide consumers with a product that they can actually smoke.

  5. Kvatch… I’m talking physical, hold in your hand books. Kindle’s received enough bad press to scare me away for now.

  6. “. . . no other industry forces consumers to buy a product that is crippled by design.”

    Actually, IBM tried it back in the ’80’s, with the PCjr. It was an unmitigated disaster and cost the company many millions.

    As for lifetime access to copyrighted material one has bought, if the deal is for limited-time use, or rental, that should be made plain up front. Otherwise, the seller is engaging in a deceptive practice. The default standard in our society is that when you buy something, you own it.

  7. Robert… “Book”? What’s that?

    What next?!

    Frogette… Your retirement savings will expire. Oh wait…that already happened!

  8. …if the deal is for limited-time use, or rental, that should be made plain up front.

    S.W… Exactly the problem with “DRM-enabled storefronts”, market conditions preclude them making any such pledge.

    Digital is forever.

    Mr_Blog… Not so. Though I think that notion of digital scratches is charming, copy your digital material enough and you start accumulating errors. I’ve got a number of MP3s that are experiencing drop-outs as I copy them from media to media. Fortunately, as my storage capacity increases, I rip at progressively higher and higher rates…essentially refreshing the quality of my music.

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