Kangaroo Tails

There has been a lot of discussion in Australia about climate change and our food preferences. We curse the bastard who introduced fluffy bloody bunnies to this arid land. We should be cursing the ones who bought sheep and cattle here too.

The fact is our terrain cannot cope hard footed critters, or the ones that eat grass down beyond the roots. Kangas have been surviving this land far longer than the aborigines, and they are one of the longest continuing human groups.

Kangaroo is a common bush food, usually as patties, but that’s because we haven’t explored preparation methods. It is even more common as dog food. But as a meat it is gamey and quite edible.

The trouble is you can’t farm roos like ‘domesticated’ animals. They can jump tall buildings in a single leap. Free range is the ways to go, and the method cuts out a whole agricultural sector, the slaughter house.

All we need is a constant movement of trucks picking up those carcasses. Of course the findings would be best treated as stews or bully beef type products.

I’m just pricing a fleet of refrigerated trucks with bloody big kanga bars. I figure we could harvest and collect in one grand operation. of course it will take time to build a wider market, but for the soup kitchen market, the ones who begrudge spending drug money on food are a clear early target.

7 thoughts on “Kangaroo Tails”

  1. You know Cartledge, I’ve actually eaten kangaroo (wild game dinner, don’t ask), and it’s got to be an acquired taste. I found it indescribable. Good luck with your roadkill stew line. I think you’re the next Emeril – BAM!

  2. Frogette, the only thing that put me off for years was the tendency of hunters to leave the roo carcasses lying in the trunk for a week before dealing with them. In retrospect I guess that might be some sort of curing process – and I thought it was just laziness.
    I don’t know your Emeril, but our butchered sheep and cattle meat here tends to taste gamy, as it is mostly pasture fed. I use cumin to modify (hide) that and often resort to cajun type herbs and seasonings. Hardly Australian, but I don’t thing the diners here will notice.

  3. Cattle ranching is very inefficient. It takes 14 pounds of grain to produce one pound of beef. That’s a huge waste. Of course, it would all be much more efficient if people didn’t need their 14 ounce sirloins at dinner. Here in the US, some people can’t fathom the notion of having maybe a 3 or 4 ounce portion of whatever meat they like and that’s it. Nope. Gotta be half a pound at a minimum. I’ve been in these restaurants where they have 32 ounce steaks on the menu. Once I see that, I never go back, because you know this isn’t a place where quality is also on the menu…and it isn’t. Speaking as a foody, I love all kinds of meats and poultry and fish, but I also love fruits and vegetables. Mrs DBK and I have one evening a week where dinner is a lentil and rice curry. That usually winds up being my lunch the next day, too.

    Ultimately, the issue is always one of moderation.

  4. You’ve the right idea there Cartledge. Roo is like some of the wild meat here in the Southern U.S. like Nutria(a large swamp rodent). Good protein but it needs to be “enhanced” with some cajun or creole seasoning. Nutria is found all over Louisiana and the local cajun cooks make a fine jambalaya out of it. I am sure the same would go for roo. Good luck with the business.

    Oh! Emeril Lagasse is a famous American chef who got is start in New Orleans at the old Commander’s Palace. Originally from up North he adopted Cajun and Creole and is famous for his final seasoning move where he takes a pinch of “spice” and dramatically dashes it on the plate with a loud “Bam”.

  5. 14 ounce sirloins at dinner. Here in the US, some people can’t fathom the notion of having maybe a 3 or 4 ounce portion of whatever meat they like and that’s it.

    DBK… 14 OZ?!!! That’s crazy! I’ve reached the point where if I eat 1/4 lb. that’s too much beef.

    Fallenmonk, Cartledge… Have disagree with the prevailing opinion on Kangaroo. I enjoyed it with only minimal spices. Think I mentioned before that it has a flavor unlike anything I’d ever tasted. Very enjoyable.

  6. “Ultimately, the issue is always one of moderation” Does that mean I can’t do super jumbo cans?
    As to seasoning, at the very least I would cut the game with cumin, but canned meat has traditionally been spiced, to hide the rank flavours I expect.
    I’m sure more than a few Americans have had Kanga steak. An abattoir was prosecuted here some years ago for exporting kanga labelled as beef.
    Some tell me its very much like goat which I really enjoy. But the goat I’ve eaten was very young and had a delightful nutty flavour.

  7. Some tell me its very much like goat which I really enjoy. But the goat I’ve eaten was very young and had a delightful nutty flavour.

    Hard to say. Having been raised on the US-Mexico border, the only goat I’ve eaten is usually grilled (in other words, thoroughly over cooked) or in a highly spiced stew. Still good–but really no way to tell what the flavors were originally like.

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