Tag Archives: Iraq OCCUPATION

Zaidi regrets throwing shoes at Bush – “I should have just shouted ‘you lie'”

The Iraqi journalist who threw his shoes at former President George W. Bush expressed regret today, soon after his release from prison after serving nine months of a three year sentence.

“I’m sorry,” Muntader al-Zaidi told a gathering of reporters at the al-Baghdadia television studio, and added, “that America had such a satanic warmongering leader for eight years.”

A reporter for al-Baghdadia who was covering the Dec. 14, 2008 press conference held by Bush and Iraq prime minister Nuri al-Maliki, Zaidi threw his shoes at Bush and shouted, “this is for the widows and orphans and all those killed in Iraq,” as an act of protest.

“While I was in prison I did a lot of thinking and learning to take my mind off the daily beatings, and what I realized was that shoe-throwing is not something you do in a free society,” said Zaidi.

Zaidi went on to say, “I should have just yelled the stuff about widows and orphans. And even that was too wordy, I should have just yelled ‘you lie!’ like that patriotic American congressman,” he said.

“I learned there is no penalty if you do that in a free society, absolutely none at all, zero, nada. And as we all know Iraq is totally free thanks to American intervention,” Zaidi said.

Zaidi appeared to be in good condition after his imprisonment, although he was missing a front tooth. However, he said he would be getting dental work done thanks to the single payer health system — created by the new Iraq constitution drafted by the Bush Administration in 2005.

Iraqi Contractors Ignored Electrical Hazards

Considering the track record of U.S. contractors in Iraq, it comes as no surprise that Iraq is simply not wired right. Power remains erratic in much of Iraq, resulting in spiderwebs of wires running from homes to generators all over the country.

Like these:
Poor electrical work by contractors in Iraq is also plaguing our troops. New York Times writer James Risen reports, “Shoddy electrical work by private contractors on United States military bases in Iraq is widespread and dangerous, causing more deaths and injuries from fires and shocks than the Pentagon has acknowledged, according to internal Army documents.” When challenged by it’s few qualified electricians that were concerned about shoddy work, contractors often told them “it’s a war zone.”

Even though village idiot Brian Kilmeade doesn’t want to hear it, according to Army Times, 11 service members and two U.S. civilians have been killed because Halliburton and KBR “improperly installed electrical wiring or failed to fix known electrical hazards”.

Raw Story has more.

There is a bright side to the electrical nightmare in Iraq. In certain areas they’re converting to solar with some measure of success.

“Today We Have 50 Saddams”

Yesterday was the fifth anniversary of the statue of Saddam Hussein falling in Iraq.

Five years ago William Shawcross wrote this in the Wall Street Journal (h/t Rachel Maddow):

April 9th–Liberation Day! What a wonderful, magnificent, emotional occasion–one that will live in legend like the fall of the Bastille, V-E Day or the fall of the Berlin Wall. Watching the tearing down of Saddam Hussein’s towering statue in Baghdad was a true Ozymandias moment.

It slowly tumbled and, with perfect symbolism, just two rusty pipes were left sticking up from the boots. In the BBC’s London studio an Iraqi dissident said though tears, “April 9 is not just spring, it is for Iraqis eternal spring.”

(more)

Well done Shawcross, you idiot. Read the rest of that article it’s really effed up. It’ll bring back some old memories.

Ibrahim Khalil, an Iraqi mechanic, took part in toppling that statue. He told AFP that he deeply regrets that. “If history can take me back,” he said, “I will kiss the statue of Saddam Hussein which I helped pull down.” He went on to tell AFP, “Now I realize that the day Baghdad fell was in fact a black day. Saddam’s days were better. I ask Bush: ‘Where are your promises of making Iraq a better country?’ These days when we go out we have to carry a pistol. In Saddam’s regime, we were safe. We got rid of one Saddam, but today we have 50 Saddams.”